2018 Brazilian GP Qualifying – Red Bull Racing

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2018 Brazilian GP Qualifying – Red Bull Racing

10 NOVEMBER 2018
BRAZILIAN GP – QUALIFYING
MAX VERSTAPPEN, Position: P5 1:07.778 – (Practice 3 – P5 1:08.733)
“We did the best we could, which was fifth, so I think we should be happy with that. Conditions were a bit tricky but everyone handled it very well in the garage and we came through with a good performance. We tried to get a quicker lap on the soft tyre in Q2 but just missed out. It isn’t a disaster starting on supersofts so we aren’t too concerned. The balance of the car wasn’t ideal, we were missing some front grip. If we had it spot on we may have had a small chance of challenging a Ferrari, but when you are losing so much time on the straights it is always going to be a difficult. I’m confident the car has a good set-up for the race. Tomorrow it looks like it will get warmer and therefore tougher on the rear tyres, we should be in good shape as I think this suits us better. It is always going to be a hard race in the dry around here so if the rain comes, I think it could play into our hands.”
DANIEL RICCIARDO, Position: P6 1:07.780* – (Practice 3 – P6 1:08.788)
“I think we have a good car and in qualifying to be half a second off pole around here, where from memory we haven’t been that close in the past, is positive. We also know from yesterday that we are even better in race conditions. Obviously, with the penalty I start a bit outside of the front pack in 11th but I will hopefully make my way through quickly and have some fun once I join the fight at the front. The rain passed pretty quickly but it did force us to use the supersoft tyre in Q2. Ideally, we wanted to start on the soft tomorrow but fortunately it was only Ferrari who made it work and Mercedes are in the same position as us. I don’t think it makes too much difference as we have a good car on the super and also good tyre management. Maybe this mixed strategy will also force a two-stop race through the field and mix things up. I had some experience last year of coming from the back so I know a few spots around this track to overtake on and I’m game for that. I think my race will be shaped on how quickly I can get through the field and latch on to the top five. Anyway, whatever happens it’ll be fun.”
*Car 3 will drop five grid positions following a penalty for using a sixth turbo charger.
CHRISTIAN HORNER, Team Principal:
“It was an exciting qualifying with the threat of rain throughout the sessions. With Max actually topping Q1 we then elected to run the supersoft to ensure being on the right tyre on the damp track in Q2 which turned out to be dry. Both drivers were within a couple of thousandths of each other in Q3 on both runs and to end up fifth and sixth is about where we expected to be around here. We are very quick in the middle sector but unfortunately sectors one and three expose our weaknesses. Nonetheless, we believe we have encouraging race pace, and despite Daniel’s penalty hopefully both drivers can feature strongly in the race tomorrow.”
Ends
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High steaks racing
Anyone feeling just a little bit bloated? Anyone waking up at about 3am feeling massively dehydrated and lathered in the meat sweats? Yep, after Austin and Mexico City we’re into our third consecutive grill-obsessed race and Brazil, with its wall-to-wall array of churrascarias, might just be the daddy of them all. So, to celebrate this weekend in the cathedral of the carnivorous – and with apologies to the paddock’s much healthier adherents of plant-based diets – we present a few juicy, meaty, cow-based facts…
1. Cow mad Brazil – According to the 2018 World Cattle Inventory (yes, there is such a thing) of the USDA, Brazil has the second largest cattle population on the planet. Ranging across the 8.516 million km² of Brazil are some 232 million cattle, making up 23.19% of the whole world’s cattle. In 2017 there were 1.08 head of cattle per person in the country. Who tops the Brazilians? That would be the Indians, with 305m cattle.
2. World’s most expensive burger – If you fancy a credit card-melting burger experience then head on over to the South of Houston restaurant, in The Hague, Netherlands. There, chef Diego Buik, formerly of London’s Soho House, last year created what Guinness records rank as the world’s priciest patty – at £1,785 each. The ingredient of this supremely decadent burger are: a Japanese dry-aged Wagyu and Black Angus beef patty, Oosterschelde lobster infused with Hermit Dutch Coastal Gin, foie gras, white truffles, Remeker cheese, Japanese fruit tomatoes and caviar, as well as French lettuce, Iberian ham, and a specially-concocted sauce made with 35 lobsters, Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee, Madagascan vanilla, saffron and Japanese soy. Finally it’s all stuffed in a brioche bun covered in gold leaf.
3. High-cost Kobe – Want to go one better than Wagyu, then Kobe is the way to go. Kobe is a specific type of Wagyu called Tajima-Gyu and is raised to strict standards in the prefecture of Hyogo (capital, Kobe). And if you want to really push the boat out then you need to get the Kobe at Wagyumafia, a restaurant in Tokyo’s Akasaka district. There a 12-ounce portion of chateaubriand will set you back $2,500, making it the most expensive Kobe in the world according to the World Record Academy.
4. Vintage Beef – Normally when a waiter asks if you’d like the 2000 or the 2003 vintage then it’s in reference to wine, but in France butcher Alexandre Polmard offers (arguably) the ultimate in unique – and eye-wateringly expensive – cow. In the 1990s Polmard’s father and grandfather, also butchers, developed a meat treatment called ‘hibernation’ in which cold air is blown at speeds of 120 km/h over the meat from Blonde Aquitaine cattle in a -43 C environment. This allows meat to be kept for any length of time and, according to Polmard, with no loss of quality. His 2000 vintage cote de boeuf (rib steak) can command up to €3,000 ($3,200).
5. World’s largest barbeque beef – According to Guinness the world record for the largest serving of barbecued beef is a whopping 13,713 kilos (30,231.99 lbs) of raw beef that converted into 9,132 kilos (20,132.61 lbs) of grilled glory and was achieved by Frigorífico General Pico and Municipalidad de General Pico at Predio Sociedad Rural de General Pico, in General Pico, La Pampa, Argentina, on 20 March 2011.
2018-11-10T20:04:20+00:00November 10th, 2018|Brazilian Grand Prix, Formula One, Red Bull|