2018 British GP Qualifying – Red Bull Racing

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2018 British GP Qualifying – Red Bull Racing

7 JULY 2018
BRITISH GP – QUALIFYING
MAX VERSTAPPEN Position: 5th 1:26.602 (Practice 3 – P5 1:28.012)
“I was actually very happy in Qualifying and we made a good step with the car but if you lose one second or more on the straights it’s going to be difficult around here. This track is getting less and less favourable for us which is a shame. In the end we were eight tenths behind but can actually be quite happy with what we did and the car was performing really well. No regrets, but I just wish that we had a bit more horsepower. It’s going to be hard tomorrow and I think with no luck we will most likely finish fifth as that’s the pace we have in the car but with a bit of luck of course we can move forward. I hope it’s not going to be a boring race but at the moment I think we may be in a bit of a no-man’s land. For sure in the race we will lose less on the straights, but maybe still five or six tenths which is still way too much. This year showed that sometimes when you expect the race to be boring it is actually quite entertaining, so I hope everyone keeps their televisions on.”
DANIEL RICCIARDO, Position: 6th 1:27.099 (Practice 3 – P6 1:28.018)
“Today was challenging and a bit frustrating. On the best run in Q3 I didn’t have DRS working between turns four and six so we lost a bit of time there but we were missing a lot already. Silverstone has proven to be a real horsepower circuit these days, a lot of the corners are full throttle, turns one, two and nine are not really corners anymore, it’s all about horsepower. Knowing how much we lose on the straights and then losing DRS was pretty frustrating. We kind of knew yesterday that we were going to struggle to be better than the third row, so we’ve set the car up more for the race, so let’s hope that pays dividends tomorrow. I’m hoping it gets hotter and hotter so the tyres become a factor, if it’s a one stop race then it obviously limits our chances but if it’s on the cusp then it could be interesting. Let’s hope the fans need factor 75 tomorrow, if that even exists (laughs). We’re still a long way off Ferrari and Mercedes but in the race things can change so hopefully tomorrow provides something a bit different. In Austria we didn’t really seem that fast but in the race we turned it around which gives us some optimism.”
CHRISTIAN HORNER, Team Principal:
“To have locked out the third row is representative of our qualifying ability here at Silverstone. We do not have the one lap pace of our main rivals on Saturday afternoons at a circuit like Silverstone where power dominates so much now. Max extracted the best he could from the car for P5, and while Daniel’s DRS malfunctioned during Q3, we had permission to manually override it for his final run to cross the line in P6. Nevertheless, as we have seen for much of this season, we have a good race car and our race pace puts us much closer to both Ferrari and Mercedes and with the heatwave temperatures set to rise even higher tomorrow, it could still be an exciting British Grand Prix. The story of the day though is the England football team, congratulations to them. Maybe it’s coming home!”
 
Ends
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A long strange trip…
In a little over 30 hours it’ll all be over – the last flight case will be clamped shut, the bolts will drop on the truck doors and Formula 1’s first triple header will mercifully come to an end. Has it had any affect? Well, that’s hard to call, but you’ll know you’re suffering chronic triplitis when:
1.You’re at Silverstone, you’re wearing shorts and slathering on sunscreen with such abandon that you look like a greased pig. Clearly, you are hallucinating as in the Silverstone microclimate (also known as Britain) the temperature never rises above 11˚C and it rains 365 days a year.
2. Your driver’s feedback that he’d like a lot more speed on the Hangar straight but a lot more downforce everywhere else, regardless of DRS, starts making sense.
3. At the end of pack down you automatically set the GPS for Hockenheim and start driving. It takes a tranquiliser dart to bring you down.
4. You arrive home and the first order of business is to check the spring rates on your ride-on lawnmower, and having covered your child’s go kart in flo-vis you compile a detailed report about its aerodynamic load.
5. You refer to all of your family as ‘mate’, as you no longer remember their names.
6. You are uncomfortable talking to your children in person and insist on conversing with them via FaceTime – even though they are right in front of you.
7. All the clothes in your wardrobe smell ‘funny’, an odour that is later reclassified as ‘clean’.
8. You fail to gain entry to your house as the doorbell doesn’t sound like the swipe gate. You wait outside for six hours until your wife comes home and lets you in. You don’t mind as you think the curfew is still in force.
9. When you take the dog for a walk (which you insist on calling FP1) you get frustrated when he doesn’t improve his lap time around the park. His feedback is only marginally better than your regular driver but you still have to spend 20 minutes optimising his collar settings.
10. At the end of the day, you wish your wife goodnight by saying ‘sleep tight Brian, love you’. Brian is not her name. Brian is the name of your roommate. This is bad. Very bad.
2018-07-17T22:55:16+00:00July 7th, 2018|British Grand Prix, Formula One, Red Bull|