08 APRIL 2017

 

CHINESE GP – QUALIFYING

 

DANIEL RICCIARDO, Position: 5th, 1:35.092 (Practice 3 – P7 1:33.033)

“Personally I’m happy with what I was able to get out of the car this afternoon but obviously as a team and as a driver we want more. I felt like up until today we still probably hadn’t got the most out of the setup but in qualifying I felt pretty comfortable with the car. I could lean on it more or less as much as I wanted but we are still missing some performance compared to Mercedes and Ferrari. However, I felt we improved the balance a lot from this morning and we made some bold changes which helped us in qualifying. You won’t see me looking disappointed if it rains tomorrow as the wet conditions always create more opportunities and it will be up to me to maximise those if it happens. We hope to have a good car in the wet; downforce plays a huge role in those conditions so we will have to wait and see. Whatever happens it will certainly be an exciting race for the spectators and we will do all we can to be on the podium.”

 

 

MAX VERSTAPPEN, Position: 19th, 1:35.433 (Practice 3 – P6 1:34.946)

“Starting from nineteenth on the grid is going to be tough but I think there is rain on the way. There was something misfiring in the engine which meant we were down on power, I tried to do a lap that could at least get me through to Q2 but the issue just wouldn’t let me. The guys will investigate this evening and I’m confident they can resolve it for the race. It is of course very unfortunate but these things happen and we need to move on. A bit of rain tomorrow will definitely help us but I think even in the wet it will be tough to challenge Ferrari and Mercedes. We need to concentrate on what we have and do the best we can. I will go home tonight, get some good rest and sleep, then come to the track ready to attack on what will hopefully be a wet track. If it is dry tomorrow you lose too much time starting from where I am on the grid. We will see, some good overtakes and exciting racing is what I’m hoping for.”

 

 

CHRISTIAN HORNER, Team Principal: “A very frustrating qualifying for Max, an unfortunate issue for him that looks engine related but hopefully can be salvaged without penalty for tomorrow. I think Daniel extracted everything possible from the car today, fifth is a fair reflection on where we currently are. Hopefully tomorrow we can make some progress in the race and with the threat of some weather around that can always present some opportunities as well.”

 

Ends

 

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Fake News

 

In Formula One rumours and misinformation abounds. Here Spy presents the totally, completely, 100 per cent fake news ahead of the Chinese Grand Prix

 

Ricciardo blames ‘gravel’ for his Australian Grand Prix qualifying crash

After his shock exit from Australian Grand Prix qualifying, Red Bull Racing driver Daniel Ricciardo appeared to point the finger of blame squarely at the gravel trap in which his RB13 became stranded. “That wasn’t there on the previous lap,” said the furious Australian in between punching autograph hunters. “Obviously the marshals are supposed to signal when a new gravel trap forms spontaneously – but with the low angle of the sun through the trees at Albert Park, it’s sometimes difficult to see the flags.” Ricciardo later backtracked on his claim when pictures emerged of a track map taped to his cockpit clearly showing the offending trap. The Western Australian later adopted the standard line of taking full responsibility for the crash while frantically hinting something had probably gone wrong with the car.

“Yeah, why not,” said race engineer Simon Rennie.

 

Shanghai Paddock not sinking

Organisers of the Chinese Grand Prix have denied the track and paddock are sinking into the reclaimed marshland on which the Shanghai International Circuit is built and instead have insisted the reason the buildings look considerably closer to the water than they did ten years ago is due to “exceptionally heavy rainfall. Because climate-change.”

 

Verstappen demands V10s

Moody Dutch teenager Max Verstappen has demanded F1 return to V10 engines – despite not having the faintest clue what a V10 engine is. Speaking to Autosport the Spanish Grand Prix juvenile, who had just turned eight when V10s were retired,” said “yeah” when asked if he thought V10s would be cool. He then added: “like those retro Nokia phones, or house music.” When it was explained that a V10 is an engine with ten cylinder arranged in a V-formation and not, as Max thought, some sort of fruit juice, the Dutch tot laughed and said “that would be silly,” before becoming distracted and wandering off to chase an interesting leaf.

 

Rosberg ‘watching TV’

Reigning World Champion Nico Rosberg has responded to reports of “loud, almost hysterical laughter,” emitting from his Monaco home early last Sunday morning by claiming to have been watching a particularly funny film on TV. “Yeah, so I’m a big Adam Sandler fan and The Waterboy was showing. I was laughing at that, not… anything else.”

“I don’t know what schadenfreude means, because I’m German,” added Rosberg, helpfully.

 

Shanghai cab driver ‘knows where Shanghai International Circuit is’.

In a shock development ahead of the Chinese Grand Prix, a Shanghai taxi driver has accidentally revealed that, not only does he know where the Shanghai International Circuit is, but also, that it’s right next door to Shanghai’s Pudong International Airport.

For the previous 13 seasons, the typical F1 taxi experience from airport to circuit has followed the standard template of the driver circling Shanghai’s beltway for two to three hours in the hope the passenger spots something he or she recognises.  This is followed by increasingly agitated telephone calls, a roadside conference with other taxi drivers and the passenger finally being taken to random destinations such as hotels, shopping complexes and the Jiading McDonald’s. Today’s revelation has caused consternation. “We apologise for the lack of delay,” said a spokesman “it was his first day, he didn’t know any better.”