Ferrari LogoNext stop Melbourne

 

Circuit: Sakhir circuit – 5.412 km
Driver: Fernando Alonso
Car: Ferrari F14 T
Weather: air temperature 21/26°C, track temperature 26/36 °C. Sunny.
Laps/Kms completed: 74/400
Best time: 1:34.280

Fernando Alonso was at the wheel of the F14 T for the final day of winter testing for Scuderia Ferrari and the other ten Formula 1 teams, prior to the start of the 2014 World Championship.

In the morning, the team worked with Fernando on fine tuning some electronic configurations linked to optimising the use of energy in the new power unit. Before the lunch break, work was halted by the need to change the gearbox on the car.

In the afternoon, the technical programme moved on to a series of short and long runs to check the management of systems on the F14 T.

Over the past four days in Sakhir, the F14 T has completed a total of 337 laps, equivalent to 1.823 kilometres.

“The team did its utmost to carry out changes on the car as quickly as possible, but again today, we had planned to do more laps than we managed” – Fernando told www.ferrari.com – “There are a lot of things to learn with the use of the power unit to improve the performance of the car and we are not yet where we want to be. Everyone in the team is very competitive and we are working day and night in order to get all the potential out of the F14 T as soon as possible. We have gone through twelve days of testing that were very demanding for everyone and I would like to thank the whole team for all its efforts.”

The next time the cars will be on track will be on Friday 14 March in Melbourne’s Albert Park, when the curtain goes up on the first free practice session for the Australian Grand Prix.

 

Domenicali: “Reliability the key in Australia”

 

Sakhir, 2 March–Testing prior to the start of the 2014 Formula 1 World Championship came to an end this afternoon in Bahrain and at the end of the day, Ferrari Team Principal Stefano Domenicali shared his thoughts with the journalists. “The rule changes for this season have been so radical that I’d say to get a consensus you would need further tests before the championship gets underway. In our case, we are taking a lot of data back home, which we will now analyse in depth. Some aspects deserve more attention to achieve the performance level we are looking for, while others maybe just need a bit of fine tuning. Once back in Maranello, we will do all in our power to rectify the things that aren’t working properly yet, so that we can be as well prepared as possible in Melbourne.”

Domenicali reckons this will be an unusual season, especially in the early stages. “I believe, we could see big changes from the first race to the second and from the second to the third, with everyone bringing in developments all the time. At first, reliability will be the key, because without it you don’t score points. I also think that some teams that are struggling at the moment will be able to catch up, while teams that currently seem to have a slight advantage could see a plateau in their performance, allowing the others to close the gap. From what we have seen so far, there are two teams out in front, Mercedes and Williams. After them, it could be us.”

For Scuderia Ferrari, the remaining twelve days to go to the first race will be busy. “From our side, we know there is still a mountain of things for our engineers to develop. What I’m interested in and what I have specifically requested is that we define a list of priorities and stick to it. One aspect we will definitely be looking at is the relationship between the turbo engine and the electric energy recovery systems and there’s much to do in this area. On the other hand, we return to Maranello knowing that the figures we saw from the car during the design phase have been correlated at the track and that’s already a good starting point.”