Friday 23 November 2012

BRAZILIAN GP – FRIDAY PRACTICE

Car 1, Sebastian Vettel

“It was alright today, it was very slippery for everyone. It was quite hot today and in terms of track conditions not that easy, so I think everyone suffered the same kind of problems looking for traction and stability etc. So far we can be happy, we have to do our homework now, first comes tomorrow morning and we go from there.”

Car 2, Mark Webber

“The track was slippery today, it’s very hot. I think we’re all a little bit surprised by the lack of grip we had, but we got what we could out of today in these conditions. We got through plenty of stuff and also did a bit of’13 work, which was useful. It’s the last test before next year, so we made the most of the beautiful sunny day in Brazil, before we go to colder Jerez in February.”

STATISTICS

SEBASTIAN VETTEL

First Practice Session

Position: 2, Best Time: 1:14.140, Laps: 35

Second Practice Session

Position: 2, Best Time: 1:14.300, Laps: 40

MARK WEBBER

First Practice Session

Position: 3, Best Time: 1:14.198, Laps: 34

Second Practice Session

Position: 3, Best Time: 1:14.523, Laps: 37

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RED BULL RACING REVEALED…
Racing in Formula One is truly a team effort and as such our championship challenge bears the signature of every department of Red Bull Racing, from reception to race track. As we close out the season, this time we went all the way to the top to look at…

THIS RACE: The Team Principal’s Office

People think: He sits on the pitwall nervously tapping his foot while waiting for the chequered flag.

What they actually do is: Oversees the management and direction of the entire team, from shaping the team’s business model and reporting back to the team’s parent company to taking responsibility for the performance on track. But let’s let Christian Horner explain it better… “The role of team principal probably varies from team to team, but in our case I have overall accountability for the project in terms of how the team and the business operates, so ultimately the buck stops with me, which is a pressure I suppose, but one I’ve always relished and I continue to do so. I work very much in partnership with Adrian, in that he looks after the technical side of the team. I leave him to get on with that and I deal with all the operational aspects and effectively the running of the business. There are many elements to a grand prix team, whether it’s management, logistics, or the operational side in terms of the race team and what you do trackside. It means there are many different hats you have wear, but I think we have a very clear chain of command and, I hope, a good one. Ultimately, though, my job is about managing the efforts of a huge team of people and it really is all about the team. It’s an easy thing to say, but Formula One is the epitome of teamwork and you get nothing in this sport unless you work well together. It’s an endeavour in which over 500 individuals all need to work in absolute harmony in order to achieve the end result on a Sunday afternoon. That means every single department making its contribution, from freight and logistics to manufacturing to aerodynamics. Everyone has to deliver. The Constructors’ Championship is where the team measures itself against the rivals, so, when we achieve something like we did last weekend, there’s inevitably a sense of pride in what everyone has delivered. Department for department we’ve taken on our rivals and achieved something tremendously special in retaining the trophy for the third time, which very few teams have managed. It’s required unbelievable teamwork, dedication and a heroic effort from so many people, working as one group. It’s enormously gratifying to be a part of that group.”